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385) Cavitational effect on radioactivity (continuation).

Ludwik Kowalski

Montclair State University, New Jersey, USA
December 7, 2009

1) This is an update on what I wrote in Unit #378, about the report of Cardone et al. In addition to the first four publications listed below.

I subsequently discovered a short note (June 8, 2009) on the same subject in CERN Courier . The author, John Swain, wrote: “It is a common belief that radioactive decay rates are unchanged by external conditions, despite many examples of small shifts (particularly involving external pressure and K-capture decays) being well documented and understood. However, Fabio Cardone of the Institute per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati in Rome and colleagues have shown a dramatic increase – by a factor of 10,000 – in the decay rate of thorium-228 in water as a result of ultrasonic cavitation. Exactly what the physics is and whether or not this sort of effect can be scaled up into a technology for nuclear waste treatment remain open issues.”

2) Unable to attend ICCF15, I submitted my own set of observations (about Cardone cavitational effect) to Physics Letters. This was two days before the conference. The note I published (6) can be downloaded from my website.

http://csam.montclair.edu/~kowalski/cf/ . . . . . .

Comments on what I wrote would be highly appreciated. I plan to update this unit when new information becomes available.

3) APPENDED ON 12/7/2009

Here is the message I posted two days ago on a private Internet list for CMNS researchers:

“According to an ICCF15 report of A. Carpinteri et al. at

http://iccf15.frascati.enea.it/ICCF15-PRESENTATIONS/S6_O5_Carpinteri_Lacidogna.pdf

neutrons are emitted when iron-containing marble is mechanically crashed. [Google found this paper for me because F. Cardone is one of the three authors.] Their detector, located about 10 cm away from the marble block, recorded ten times more neutrons during the crash than during the crash of marber that did not contain iron. The authors believe that neutrons are emitted from this fission reaction:

56Fe --> 27Al + 27Al + 2n

The arrithmetic is correct, 27 + 27 +2 = 56

But the energy threshold of this reaction is 42.3 MeV. Do the authors believe that mechanical energy supplied to the crashing machine is somehow used to make the above transmutation possible? Please explain.”

X responded:
“I wonder if the crushing of marble not containing iron produces neutrons?  This would correspond to a "placebo test" for drugs. In my--possibly crackpot--theorizing, there may be a rather ubiquitous oscillator present which can be split to an electron and proton and shock-wave-deformed into neutrons.   A crushing force could set up a shock-wave, making neutrons appear "magically." That is, if "Zerotron" isn't just a figment of my overactive imagination.”

Ludwik responded:
 “(1) The link I provided has a photo of two marble blocks that did not produce neutrons and two blocks that did produce neutrons. Only the second set of blocks contained iron. (2) Hitting a granite stone with another granite stone often produces sparks. This is plasma, between two surfaces. That is what came to my mind. (3) I have no idea how was the fission of iron idea justified. Perhaps it was based only on the 27+27+2=56.”

X responded:
[You wrote] ‘Plasma between surfaces, spark formation,  Iron needed for the neutron formation.’  None of this rules out my little speculation of the "Zerotron" involvement. The "Zerotron-splitting" in pair formation supposedly only occurs near ‘matter’ Deformation would require a smash into something which wouldn't get out of the way or deform easily, perhaps Iron atoms or ions fit that requirement.”

Ludwik responded:
In other words, you do not believe their idea that fission of iron is responsible for neutrons. In any case, it is too early to speculate; let us wait till results are independently confirmed by others.

X responded:
As for me,  I simply don't know,  I tend to be skeptical about neutron formation because of my skepticism as to the presence of neutrons per se in atomic nuclei... The fission of iron could be the explanation.  I'm pointing out that there may be some other explanation for neutron formation in a lot of cases. . . . “

Ludwik responded:
No, this kind of fission could not be the explanation. The energy threshold for that particular reaction is 42.3 MeV. Where would it come from?

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